Living Lucidly

“…life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning...”

- Virginia Woolf

 

The glass house...one of the most intriguing structures ever designed. As creatures of humanity, it's in our instinct to hide the most vunerable parts of ourselves. So, why do some choose to live completely exposed? It's a beautiful mystery. 

Fascinating not for what they include, but for what they leave out, glass dwellings are meant to challenge nearly every conventional definition of domesticity. Pared down to the essentials, there is something intimidating to people about the restraint such an existence would demand. Still, the appeal of all that diligence, that precision is practically narcotic. 

I often dream of glass houses. Perhaps this gives insight into my subconscious, or maybe I just find beauty in simplicity. Either way, there is a part of me that knows deep down each of us longs to be seen and understood completely and that our lives are not meant to be hidden away, but lived in revelation and transparency. 

Philip Jonson's Glass House, New Canaan, Connecticut.

Philip Jonson's Glass House, New Canaan, Connecticut.

Farnsworth House, Plano, Illinois.

Farnsworth House, Plano, Illinois.

Haus D10, Germany.

Haus D10, Germany.

Villa Overby, Varmdo, Stockholm, Sweden

Villa Overby, Varmdo, Stockholm, Sweden

Jodlowa House, Krakow, Poland.

Jodlowa House, Krakow, Poland.

Glass House, Milan, Italy.

Glass House, Milan, Italy.

Glass House for Diver, Etajima-Hiroshima, Japan.

Glass House for Diver, Etajima-Hiroshima, Japan.

Khyber Ridge House, Whistler, British Columbia.

Khyber Ridge House, Whistler, British Columbia.

Rietland House, Amsterdam

Rietland House, Amsterdam

Be inspired...and lucid. 

Uniquely yours, 

Kimberly

Inked in Chinoiserie

chi·noi·se·rie

{SHēnˈwäzərē}

 

The palest ink is better than the best memory. - Chinese Proverb
 

What is chinoiserie? “In the 17th and 18th centuries, as tourists and traders ventured eastward, a fascination with all things Asian swept Europe. Inspired by travelers' sketchbooks and imported porcelain and lacquerware, designers layered their furniture, interiors and ceramics with fantastical Chinese imagery, resulting in the perennially popular style called chinoiserie.” - Elle Décor

Essentially, chinoiserie is a visual narration, a reenactment of history literally drawn out on furniture, wallpaper, prints and décor. Seen as exotic, chinoiserie has been sought after for centuries and is the quintessence of good design.

Even with the "palest ink", this classic motif will long have the ability to add layers of mystique and sophistication to any design...remaining inscribed in our memories.

 

 

 

Antique Chinoiserie

via: The History of Furniture

via: The History of Furniture

Chinoiserie Interiors

Images via: houzz

Images via: houzz

Chinoiserie Prints

Harrison Howard Prints

Harrison Howard Prints

Modern Chinoiserie

Dana Gibson accessories

Dana Gibson accessories

Be inspired...remember your history.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

The Right Fit

"If Cinderella's shoe was a perfect fit, why did it fall off?" - Anonymous 

What's the old saying about the cobbler's children? They go unshod? Yes, and the same can be true for a designer. Her abode is left "barefoot" while her client's is donned in glass slippers. 

My days are spent developing, curating and executing designs, but alas, my own plans for the perfect dwelling seemed to have fallen into the cinders. Not wanting them to be left behind, and knowing that a big day (moving day) was upon me, I picked them up, brushed them off and gave them new life. Not quite with the wave of a wand, but rather a bit of toil, borrowed time and endless drafts, they've been loaded into the carriage and sent on their way.

Adorned with incredible details, the quaint architecture of this new place has been a great source of inspiration. Gothic archways, inlaid wood floors, original plaster moldings and adorable niches were just a few of the traits that made me fall for its charms...and finally fit it with the right "pair of shoes." 

Be inspired...live what fits you. 

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

 

     

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

Items available through Savvy

1. Ceramic Pug sculptures  / 2. Ming Lamp / 3. Chandelier / 4. Gothic Pillow in indigo / 5. Lucite coffee table / 6. Artwork / 7. Starburst Mirror 42" Dia. / 8. Brass pharmacy pendant light / 9. Double gourd lamp / 10. Artwork / 11. Sea coral artwork in indigo

1. Ceramic Pug sculptures  / 2. Ming Lamp / 3. Chandelier / 4. Gothic Pillow in indigo / 5. Lucite coffee table / 6. Artwork / 7. Starburst Mirror 42" Dia. / 8. Brass pharmacy pendant light / 9. Double gourd lamp / 10. Artwork / 11. Sea coral artwork in indigo

Brilliant Light

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” -  Thomas A. Edison

Inspiration does not come easy. One of the greatest struggles of a designer is to conceive ideas, develop an original voice and tell a story in a way that hasn't been told before. Often, we rely on those who have come before us; those who have lit the path with brilliant ideas and allowed us to ride on their creative coattails. That doesn't mean our work is any less important, valuable or meaningful. In fact, the most essential facet of the design process is collaboration - one "inventor" illuminates another's imaginative spirit, giving light to otherwise hazy concepts. 

Keep in mind:
The electric light, one of history's most exceptional innovations, was not “invented” by Thomas Edison. He was neither the first nor the only person attempting to create an incandescent lamp. When the question arises, who invented the light bulb, Edison is typically given credit. However, he was (more accurately) continuing the work from previous inventors. Historians estimate that over twenty minds worked toward the creation and design of the light bulb. Therefore, it is appropriate to credit numerous developers. The light bulb as we know it today does not belong to one man's inventiveness, but many in combination, and is the result of much time, effort and perseverance. 

Whether it is a project of your own, or in partnership with a designer, moments will arise when the temptation to walk away from a creative endeavor is overwhelming. Ideas seem scant and the lustrous dream is dimmed. Don't give up, because in a moment's flash your most dazzling vision will come to light. 

 

Thomas A. Edison

Thomas A. Edison

Here's to the modern "Edison Bulb" - still quite handsome:

Available through Savvy:

Imogene chandelier  

Imogene chandelier  

Javier pendant

Javier pendant

Gidget lamp

Gidget lamp

Soho lights

Soho lights

Be inspired...radiate brilliance. 

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly 

Prefab{ulous}

“Freedom lies within.” - Frank Lloyd Wright

Having just returned from Dwell on Design in Los Angeles, I find myself inspired, renewed and eager to share some of the latest trends from the world of design and architecture. So, what’s cutting-edge? Prefab.

There are houses and then there are RVs. But a Wyoming company called Wheelhaus sells something that's somewhere between the two: Fully built-out, prefabricated cabins that are easily hitched to a trailer and dragged to new locations.

Wheelhaus was founded by Jackson Hole native, Jamie Mackay, whose carpenter dad gave him a background in building. His idea was to apply the same traditional techniques to recreational vehicles.

So, how does this work? You place an order based on one of the models, but you can request changes to the design—within reason. Then, you customize the interior finishes and Wheelhaus takes two to four months to actually build your order. The company wraps it up in a protective covering, loads it onto a trailer and delivers it to your door—or whatever spot you have picked out in the woods. - gizmodo

Okay, so if you want to be technical, yes, they’re mobile homes. But forget technical for a second and instead focus on the fact that these Frank Lloyd Wright–looking double-wides have king-size beds, private patios, rain showers, full kitchens, fireplaces and wi-fi…otherwise known as the barest essentials. - urbandaddy

Indeed, "freedom lies within" {the prefabricated walls of these fabulous, mobile structures}. Genius.

image: wheelhaus

image: wheelhaus

Be inspired...explore.

Uniquely yours,

Call Me Old Fashioned

"If you want to be fancy and posh, whilst filling your home with friends, merriment and breathtaking vignettes, you should probably invest in a bar cart.” – Emily Henderson

These lovely little pieces have been around for years, but have managed to spin their way back into vogue – perhaps as a direct result from our obsession with Mad Men. But, long before this show became the standard for trend-setting, there were stylish films from the 40's and 50's where the bar cart was another character, adding an air of mystery and sophistication to an already impossibly chic surrounding. Think Cary Grant, crystal decanters, maraschino cherries and a curious grin...shall I pour you another? 

 

Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, Notorious 

Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, Notorious 

Mad Men

Mad Men

Images via: houzz

Images via: houzz

 

 

 

 

 A bevy of carts available through Savvy:

1. Carr Cart / 2. Avalon Cart / 3. Lenox Cart / 4. Palm Cart / 5. Draper Cart / 6. Regina Cart

1. Carr Cart / 2. Avalon Cart / 3. Lenox Cart / 4. Palm Cart / 5. Draper Cart / 6. Regina Cart

Be inspired...call me old fashioned...that's how I roll.

Uniquely yours,

A Moment of Clarity

“You must read, you must persevere, you must sit up nights, you must inquire, and exert the utmost power of your mind. If one way does not lead to the desired meaning, take another; if obstacles arise, then still another; until, if your strength holds out, you will find that clear which at first looked dark.” 
― Giovanni Boccaccio

The power of words, the power of design, the passion for both - that is where these two roads meet. If ever I had to choose between my love for the written word and an intelligent design, I'd sit up at night without ever an answer. Thank goodness this blog allows me to combine the two - and if we think about it, isn't that what we all are trying to do on a daily basis - find the right way to convey how we feel, what we love and who we are.

A good designer knows that you are trying to express yourself through your interior. Design goes beyond the tangible - it is the process of telling a story without words, and when done well, words are no longer needed; the visual process takes over and we inherently know exactly what someone is trying to say.

To speak of that moment of clarity when a designer resolves how to tell another's story - well, there are no words.

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Images via: pinterest

Images via: pinterest

Be inspired...think clearly...but, more importantly, listen.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

 





Rags to Richly Artistic

“The greatest good you can do for another is not just share your riches, but to reveal to him his own.”  Benjamin Disraeli

Our greatest privilege as designers is to inspire our clients, but how exciting it is when the roles reverse for a moment and we are the ones who become enlightened. Such was the case for me recently.

Desiring a distinctive interior, my new (totally stylish) client suggested we use a boucherouite rug in her living area. Admittedly, it had been years since I had heard the term “boucherouite”, let alone think to use one in a space. Our conversation led me to do a little research, which then led me to share these “rediscovered riches” with you:

Boucherouite, (pronounced boo-shay-REET) is a word derived from a Moroccan-Arabic phrase for torn and reused clothing. In often very modest households, Berbere women weave carpets out of discarded scraps of material. Contrary to most European weaving techniques, based on preconceived patterns; the Berbere women weave through movement of their fingers, with no drawings or predefined designs. A thousand scraps of cotton, nylon and occasionally wool are woven into these fabulous decorative creations. The contrast between the poverty of the materials used and the richness of the final composition adds to these awe-inspiring works of modern art.

As Frédéric Damgaard notes in his excellent book Tapis et tissages, l’art des femmes berbères au Maroc: “It is easy to compare a Berbere woman in front of her loom to a pianist in front of his piano. Both compose a beautiful melody with rhythms and harmonies, colors and notes. Their scores remain flexible leaving space for personal improvisation. Both have access to large repertoires that can be interpreted according to personal whim and sensitivity.”

Whether or not one finds boucherouite work aesthetically pleasing, surely they can appreciate their quirky character, and the stories that are most assuredly woven throughout these rags to richly artistic treasures.  

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images: pinterest

images: pinterest

Be inspired...share the riches another has woven into your life.

Uniquely yours,

When the World Remains Young


"...Sunlit memories,
Where the hammock swung...
Only last July when the world was young." - Johnny Mercer

 

It all began with the latest issue of Elle Décor magazine and an objective. Finally relaxing after a long week, I flipped through the pages and came across an image of the most beautiful hammocks I had ever seen. Handwoven in Nicaragua, their charm was unmatched. Without much thought, I sourced them and jumped online to purchase one of my very own. Perhaps I should mention that as a renter of an apartment, I had no trees on which to tether my new bunk. So, the next logical option {of course} was to figure out how to hang it inside…genius! Surely my idea was so original, cool and bohemian in spirit that I was on target to set a new trend. Again online, I researched how to hang a hammock indoors. Bombarded with images from those who already had this idea and managed to bring it to fruition, I was in a familiar state: with the knowledge that there are times when I think I have come up with an imaginative concept only to be reminded that I am not the only one; and that the purpose of this blog is to continually be inspired by artistic and gifted minds. 

 

Think youthful, free-spirited, lazy days of summer...indoors. 

Image: Elle Décor   Hammocks: Nicaragua's Hang a Hammock Collective; handwoven cotton & sustainable local wood

Image: Elle Décor   Hammocks: Nicaragua's Hang a Hammock Collective; handwoven cotton & sustainable local wood

Images:  houzz

Images:  houzz

 Be inspired...dwell in a world that remains young. 

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

Black, White and Rustic All Over

"There is no black-and-white situation. It's all part of life. Highs, lows, middles."      

-Van Morrison

As I wrap up my series on color psychology and its use in interiors, I end with my favorite combination - black and white. I've always appreciated the intense contrast between these two hues, and their ability to bring instant drama to a space. Lately, I've enjoyed this classic pair most when it's coupled with rustic elements. Salvaged wood, honed concrete and rough stone are examples of materials that help to tame these stirring colors, making them more approachable and unassuming.

The color black relates to the hidden, secretive and unknown. As a result, it creates an air of mystery. In color psychology it gives protection from external stress, creating a barrier between itself and the outside world; black provides comfort while protecting emotions and hiding vulnerabilities.

Opposite on the spectrum, white is color at its most complete and pure - the color of perfection. The meaning of white is purity, innocence and wholeness. It is the blank canvas waiting to be written upon. White is totally reflective, awakening openness, growth and creativity. 

Black and white are in equal balance representing both the positive and negative. Black hides, while white brings to light. What black covers, white unveils. 

Perhaps it is because of the intense nature of these colors that I have enjoyed them most when they are rooted by earthy, rugged elements, creating a true sense of harmony and the best of all worlds. After all, life is not as simple as black and white.  

Be inspired...stay grounded. 

Uniquely yours, 

Kimberly 

 

 

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Images: 355 Mansfield Los Angeles, California , Amit Apel

Images: 355 Mansfield Los Angeles, California , Amit Apel

Prettier in Pink

“She was all cotton candy and pink champagne --- and had one of those laughs that made you feel like riding around in a convertible.”  ― Linda Bloodworth-Thomason

While perceptions of color are somewhat subjective, there are some color effects that have universal meaning. In fact, every emotion can be tied to a particular color. As a designer, it is my job to tap into the sentiments of my clients, gain perspective on their personalities and somehow find a way to express their individuality through the way they live or work. 

I'm always delighted to design for my "pink clients":

Pink is thought to have a calming effect on the brain as it raises the levels of serotonin higher than any other hue on the spectrum. Therefore, pink is associated with happiness and feelings contentment - the color of joy (tickled pink). Although it's widely associated with love and romance, pink is not just for the girls - researchers have found that men who wear pink are perceived as more masculine, approachable and capable of loving others. Even still, we girls relate to Molly Ringwald best, knowing that all all things (from our wardrobes to our interiors) are just a little bit prettier in pink. 

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Images via: houzz

Images via: houzz

Be inspired...express your color.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly 

Orange, Like Clockwork

“It’s funny how the colors of the real world only seem really real when you viddy them on the screen.”
― Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

 

Color is an essential part of how we experience the world, affecting us on conscious and subconscious levels.  It is perhaps the most powerful element of design, and when used correctly can enhance our environments and even alter our moods.  

In fact, color has such significant impact on our lives that each season Pantone declares a variety of hues that will set the trends in fashion, interiors and marketing. We’ve, no doubt, heard a lot about the Pantone color of the year, Radiant Orchid, but there is another color making a significant emergence in the design world, Celosia Orange.

Orange, a close relative of red, sparks emotion. Fun and flamboyant orange radiates warmth and energy. Interestingly, orange relates to 'gut reaction' or our gut instincts. Orange offers emotional strength in difficult times; it helps us bounce back from disappointments as it is optimistic and uplifting. Orange brings spontaneity and a positive outlook on life. In a word, orange is carefree, and it will make you feel lighthearted each time you are exposed to it…like clockwork.

Be inspired.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

Images via: flickr

Images via: flickr

Touch of Grey

"The only thing there is to say

every silver lining's got a touch of grey..." - Grateful Dead

 
As children, it is one of the first questions we learn to ask when we are getting to know someone: "What's your favorite color?" Early on, we understood the answer held meaning and insight into an individual's personality. There is no doubt we are drawn to a particular hue because of the way it makes us feel. We refer to this as "color psychology" -  it is quite powerful, and an extremely useful tool for a designer. 

Today, we are taking a look at one of the most popular colors (or non-colors as some might argue) used by those in the trade. In my opinion, when utilized correctly, it can create one of the most sophisticated palettes in existence:

"Grey is the color of intellect, knowledge and wisdom. It is perceived as long-lasting, classic and often as sleek or refined. It is a color that is dignified, conservative and carries authority. Grey is controlled and inconspicuous. Grey is timeless."

One of the most stunning applications of grey I've seen recently is within the interior of this London residence. Grounded with shades of black and enhanced by tints of white, it is a study in mastering the art of layering tone, texture and light without the crutch of a "color." It is inspiring - a silver lining...with a touch of grey. 

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Images: Architectural Digest    Designer: Hubert Zandberg

Images: Architectural Digest    Designer: Hubert Zandberg

Be inspired.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

Transforming Art

“Just as the bird sings or the butterfly soars, because it is his natural characteristic, so the artist works” - Alma Gluck

 

We are excited to have discovered this talented artist, and to be brining a bit of her wonderfully playful work to our showroom:

"Nadine Kalachnikoff, whose 3-D butterfly collages possess a whimsical sense of movement and color play, has lived one of those fantastical lives that make you question your own. She was born in Paris to a Spanish mother and a Russian father. She’s called Dalí, Warhol and Hemingway friends; and she’s been married to famed Swedish interior designer, Lars Bolander, for more than 30 years.

In 2012, she asked the universe for a new path to follow, thinking perhaps an award-winning recipe or a business venture would be revealed to her. Instead, she began her first butterfly collage. Influenced by her creative upbringing and her fascination with butterflies, she embarked on her first collection.

Shadowed in lucite, the three-dimensional collages are composed of feather butterflies, papyrus and acrylic on canvas. Half alighted on the canvas or clustered in dizzying swarms, the butterflies seem ready to spring into flight. Utilizing texture, tone and composition, each canvas creates a visual dance. There is a gaiety in her work, a sense of temporality, movement and fluctuation."  - Lars Bolander Ltd.

Be inspired…transform your passion into something beautiful.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

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Images via: Lars Bolander Ltd.

Images via: Lars Bolander Ltd.

Looking Glass

“I knew who I was this morning, but I've changed a few times since then.” 
― Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

Whether it is by reflecting light, tricking the eye to create a sense of depth, or simply to compliment the surrounding décor, looking glass has long been used to enhance a space and magnify an individual's evolving style:

"The first mirrors used by people were most likely water collected in a some kind of primitive vessel. The examples of the earliest manufactured mirrors made from pieces of polished stone such as naturally occurring volcanic glass obsidian found in Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) have been dated to around 6000 BC. Polished stone mirrors made in Central and South America date from 2000 BC onwards. Mesopotamians crafted mirrors of polished cooper from 4000 BC, and ancient Egyptians made this kind of mirrors from around 3000 BC. Chinese manufactured bronze mirrors from around 2000 BC. Mirrors produced of copper and tin speculum metal may also have been produced in China and India. Speculum metal or any precious metal mirrors were hard to produce; they were very expensive and were only owned by the wealthy." - J. Needham

If you're anything like me, your design aesthetic can change on a whim. Some days you have a great affinity for contemporary, the next traditional, then bohemian, followed by classic before landing on earthy. If the most certain quality you know about yourself is your inability to make up your mind, welcome to the world of design - a wonderland filled with countless possibilities...a true adventure.

Not many pieces have the ability to reflect your individual style better than a great mirror. The following were a few of my favorites as of this morning (but don't be surprised if I have changed my mind a few times since then):

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Interior images: Elle Décor Product: available through Savvy

Interior images: Elle Décor

Product: available through Savvy

Be inspired...reflect your style of the moment, but embrace the changes.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

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Delicate Beauty

 “And the cup he brings...has been fashioned of the clay which the potter has moistened with his own sacred tears.” ― Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet


I've always been fascinated by the intimacy a potter has with clay, and his or her ability to literally shape thoughts and emotions, giving form and purpose to otherwise undefined mass. 

In 2009, at Chicago's Art and Antique Fair, I first encountered Valeria Nascimento's work. After enjoying a conversation with the owner of the gallery that represents her, I gained a true appreciation for this gifted artist:

"Nascimento was born in Brazil (1962) and spent her childhood on a farm, giving rise to an affection and fascination with natural forms that inspires her delicate, whisper-thin, white ceramics. Each piece is made from dozens or hundreds of hand-formed ceramic shapes which are combined into small or large, wall-spanning works that take months to assemble.

So thin as to resemble paper, their jagged edges and cool whiteness give the impression of hardness at first, but the creamy off-white and shadows cast inside the ceramic hollows instead give off a soft, comforting warmth." - Woolff Gallery, London

An artist gives away pieces of themselves as an offering to those who choose to appreciate their effort...it is the cup they bring. Nascimento's contribution consists of delicate beauty, a rare and remarkable gift. 

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Images via: Woolff Gallery, London

Images via: Woolff Gallery, London

Be inspired...shape your life.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

Always had Heart

“Oz never did give nothing to the Tin Man the he didn’t, didn’t already have” – America

We often forget the “fifth wall” in an interior, but it is equally as important as the other four. In fact, a design is not complete until the ceiling has been addressed as a contributing element. There are countless treatments, but one that I seem to come back to over and over is the ever-charming tin ceiling.

"Tin ceilings initially became popular in the United States in the late 1800s, as many recent immigrants sought an affordable alternative to the exquisite but expensive ornate plasterwork used in Europe. The abundance of tin in America—along with the advent of mass production—created a ready market for thin, rolled tin plates that were individually stamped with embossed patterns. Tin ceilings remained popular throughout the Art Deco period before gradually falling out of favor in the 1930s."*

Fortunately, the popularity of tin ceilings has reemerged for those architects and designers looking to bring a sense of nostalgia, character, warmth and humility to a space - these endearing tiles still have the ability to do just that - because much like the Tin Man, they have always had heart. 

Be inspired...look up.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

"I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls"

"I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls 
With vassals and serfs at my side, 
And of all who assembled within those walls 
That I was the hope and pride. 
I had riches all too great to count 
And a high ancestral name. 
But I also dreamt which pleased me most 
That you loved me still the same..."  - aria from The Bohemian Girl 


Written by Irish composer, Michael William Balfe in 1843, The Bohemian Girl, is beautiful opera, in three acts, that tells the story of Arline who was kidnapped by gypsies as a child. She cannot recall the fact that she was born into wealth, hence the dream she has of dwelling in "marble halls." 

Found only in a remote area of west Ireland, Connemara marble is truly one of the rarest and most exquisite stones in existence. It has long inspired architects, artists and poets as its billowing mix of green hues brings to mind Ireland's rolling landscape.  

I cannot tell you how many times I have ripped "green marble" out of client's homes and replaced it with something more "neutral." I have to admit, I am rethinking my choices. After pouring over hundreds of images and reading dozens of articles, I am reminded of this stone's incredible history and inherent beauty. 

During my research, one of the most stunning applications of Connemara marble I came across was in the design of Monsieur Bleu at The Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France. The brasserie is anything but blue. In fact, it is handsomely decked in varying shades of green. Truly alluring, one of the most gorgeous elements in the design was the use of this Irish marble and the way it was wrapped around the banquettes and washed over the floors. Gorgeous.

Though I should be dreaming of Ireland on St. Patrick's Day, tonight I will dream of Paris, and that I dined surrounded by green marble...and loved it still the same. 

Connemara marble in slab

Connemara marble in slab

The varying shades of Connemara marble  

The varying shades of Connemara marble  

Monsieur Bleu, Paris 

Monsieur Bleu, Paris 

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images via: google

images via: google

Be inspired...dream in green. Happy St. Patrick's Day.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly

Authentically Chic

"If it was never new and it never gets old, then it’s a folk song." - Inside Llewyn Davis 

If a folk song could be interpreted into design, here it is. I can practically hear the guitar strumming and earthy voice crooning as I pour over the architecture and interior of this wonderful Malibu home. Originally designed by the great Frank Gehry, now occupied by (the not terribly hideous) Patrick Dempsey, it is the perfect example of something I never grow tired of: authenticity. Simple in character, genuine in spirit and laid-back in form (like a great folk song) this style is certainly not new, but I promise it will never get old...it's casual-chic.

 

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Images: Architectural Digest

Images: Architectural Digest

Be inspired...treasure simple, casual moments...they are the most authentic.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly 

Catching Fireflies

“Principles for the Development of a Complete Mind: Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses- especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.”  ― Leonardo da Vinci

Every so often, you come across someone who "gets it." My recent discovery of the brilliant glass artist, Alison Berger, made me realize there are still those who don't need to be shown, but who see. From her childhood fascination of catching fireflies in simple jars, to her poetic approach of modern glass sculpting, Berger understands the importance of sharing her craft in a way that is both methodical and imaginative, timeless and contemporary.

Glass is made from sand, sand is made from time...and time is memory. Berger beautifully captures this truth in her work, and I in my study of it feel like I am catching fireflies...an enlightening exploration.
 

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The Process

The Process

Chamber Pendant

Chamber Pendant

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Vessels

Vessels

Lachrymatory (Tear Bottle)

Lachrymatory (Tear Bottle)

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Pistil Pendant

Pistil Pendant

Word Pendant

Word Pendant

Scripted Pendant

Scripted Pendant

Chamber Chandelier

Chamber Chandelier

Chamber Chandelier from below

Chamber Chandelier from below

Firefly Pendant

Firefly Pendant

Be inspired...capture brilliance, study it, learn how to see.

Uniquely yours,

Kimberly